Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865)

Abraham_LincolnAbraham Lincoln was born on February 12, 1809, to Thomas Lincoln and Nancy Hanks, two uneducated farmers, in a one-room log cabin on the 348-acre Sinking Spring Farm, in southeast Hardin County, Kentucky (now part of LaRue County), making him the first president born outside the original Thirteen Colonies. Lincoln’s ancestor Samuel Lincoln had arrived in Hingham, Massachusetts in the 17th century, but his descendants had gradually moved west, from Pennsylvania to Virginia and then westward to the frontier.

For some time, Thomas Lincoln, Abraham’s father, was a respected and relatively affluent citizen of the Kentucky backcountry. He had purchased the Sinking Spring Farm in December 1808 for $200 cash and assumption of a debt. The family belonged to a Hardshell Baptist church, although Abraham himself never joined their church, or any other church for that matter.

In 1816, the Lincoln family was forced to make a new start in Perry County (now in Spencer County), Indiana. He later noted that this move was “partly on account of slavery,” and partly because of difficulties with land deeds in Kentucky: Unlike land in the Northwest Territory, Kentucky never had a proper U.S. survey, and farmers often had difficulties proving title to their property.

When Lincoln was nine, his mother, then 34 years old, died of milk sickness. Soon afterwards, his father remarried to Sarah Bush Johnston. Lincoln was affectionate toward his stepmother, whom he would call “Mother” for the rest of his life, but he was distant from his father. ~Wikipedia

A woman is the only thing I am afraid of that I know will not hurt me.

All I am, or can be, I owe to my angel mother.

Better to remain silent and be thought a fool than to speak out and remove all doubt.”

Books serve to show a man that those original thoughts of his aren’t very new at all.”

Common looking people are the best in the world: that is the reason the Lord makes so many of them.”

He has a right to criticize, who has a heart to help.”

Advertisements

7 Responses to Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865)

  1. Daniel says:

    I think its funny that all men have a universal fear of females at some point in their lives however, have a deep respect and admiration for their mothers. How can we love something so dearly and fear it all at the same time? it like saying one loves a rootbeer float, but hates iced cream. (that analogy wasn’t very good) But in a sense that a mother is a caring and loving father in the context of the family system, when we add the uncertainty of a dating relationship the ice cream that was a major contributor to the float is now the essence of our problems.

  2. Narges says:

    Hmmm you read my mind Daniel…except for the fact that I was hoping that you men might be able to answer some of those questions. Yet ironically, you are the one who posed them. So those were my thoughts exactly…why ARE men afraid of women? or are they? and if so why? and i am not so sure that Lincoln’s quote is all the way accurate because I feel as though sometimes men ARE afraid of being hurt by women… aren’t they?

    i don’t know. Basically I just want to hear a guy’s perspective…What do you guys feel about that first quote? Does it ring true? and again if it does…WHY?

  3. Daniel says:

    I think it’s funny that all men have a universal fear of females at some point in their lives, however, have a deep respect and admiration for their mothers. How can we love something so dearly and fear it all at the same time? It’s like saying that one loves a rootbeer float, but hates vanilla ice cream. (that analogy wasn’t very good) But it works in a sense that a mother is caring and loving and when part of a family system with a father is loved and cherished. In contrast when we add the uncertainty of a dating relationship, the vanilla ice cream, which was a major contributor to the float, is now the essence of our problems.

  4. Steven says:

    Narges, I think men fear women for the same reason people fear anything: their intentions are largely unknown and therefore unpredictable, their actions and thoughts are separate and therefore uncontrollable, and their affections have the power to make or break us, that is, to show us unloveable.

  5. Tyler says:

    Men fear the unknown (I fear the unknown).
    I think often women are the most unknown and uncertain thing in our lives and as close as we may be they can sometimes seem a foreign species. It’s scary for us to know know what’s going to happen next, but to instead submit ourselves to risk, vulnerability, and hope that our male relational dread will not have been founded and that each encounter with the foreign-language-speaking-female may leave us with less reason to fear our next interaction with the uncertain.

  6. Will says:

    I am 23 and i can tell you why men fear women, women are really wonderful and we are afraid to screw up you know like that afraid of something that seems to good to be true and at the same time is alive and talking to you. God really knew what he was doing just think how Adam reacted Genesis 2:23 “This is now bone of my bones and flesh of my flesh” this was basically a gasp of amazement at God’s work.

    • occhristiancounseling says:

      I think you’re right, Will. I’m going to send you my newsletter. If you like it, you can pass it on to other guys who might enjoy learning more about men and women as God intends them to be. Today’s issue is especially good in regard to what you’ve said. Thanks for posting! ~ Warmly, Dr. Debi

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s